What is the best process temperature for IWE?

Water is a molecule that is essential for life on Earth. It is a simple compound made up of two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom, and it is known for its unique properties that make it vital for living organisms. One of the most interesting properties of water is its density, which is a measure of its mass per unit volume. In this blog post, we will explore the temperature at which water is most dense and how this property affects its ability to act as a solvent.


Water is densest at a temperature of 4°C (39.2°F). At this temperature, water has the highest density of any temperature in the liquid range. This is due to the unusual behavior of water's density as a function of temperature. Water is densest at 4°C because the molecules in liquid water are more closely packed together at this temperature than they are at higher or lower temperatures.


As water is heated above 4°C, its density begins to decrease. At higher temperatures, the increased kinetic energy of the water molecules causes them to vibrate more rapidly, which creates more space between them. This decrease in density continues until the water reaches its boiling point, at which point the water begins to vaporize and turn into a gas.


So, why is the temperature at which water is most dense important? One key application of this property is in the extraction of terpenes from flowers. Terpenes are aromatic compounds that are found in many plants, and they are often extracted using a solvent such as water.


The density of the water can affect its ability to dissolve and extract the terpenes from the plant material. Water with a lower density will have a greater ability to dissolve and extract the terpenes, while water with a higher density may be less effective.


Therefore, when extracting trichomes from flowers, it is important to use water that is at or near its maximum density to avoid extracting terpenes. This will ensure that the water is able to dissolve and extract as little of the terpenes as possible from the plant material.


In summary, water is densest in its liquid form at a temperature of 4°C. At this temperature, the water molecules are more closely packed together, resulting in the highest density of any temperature in the liquid range. This property can affect the ability of water to act as a solvent, particularly when extracting trichomes from flowers. By using water that is at or near its maximum density, it is possible to reduce the effectiveness as a solvent, limiting its ability to extract terpenes.